Timeline for Summer Internship Seekers

February

Finding & Researching Opportunities

Internship hunting can be daunting. If you’re not sure where to your search for internship opportunities, here are a few places to look:

  1. Your college’s career center
    1. Many colleges have an online database of internship opportunities you can search from
    2. Make an appointment with a career center counselor to go over your interests and ambitions and see if they can point in the right direction
    3. Many career centers also offer workshops on resume writing, practice interviews, etc.
  2. Your professors
    1. Professors are constantly doing research and may have some summer research opportunities available or know of one
    2. If there’s a particular class you’re interested in, go over your specific interests and ambitions with your professor and see if they can recommend a company, colleague, etc. doing similar work
    3. Many times (summer) fellowships require professor recommendations, so it’s always a good idea to establish a working relationship with a professor so that they can write you a good recommendation later on
  3. USAjobs.gov
    1. Interested in a government opportunity? Find internships for current students and new grads on the USAjobs.gov website
  4. Industry blogs, websites, and even social media accounts
  5. Internship/job search engines
    1. The Muse, Monster, LinkedIn, Indeed , etc.
  6. Company Website
    1. If you already know which companies you’re interested in, head directly to their website and see if they have any openings on their career page
  7. Your mentor
    1. Reach out to your Bernie mentor and ask if they can assist you with this or with any part of the internship seeking process

Once you start job searching, it can be easy to spiral down a rabbit hole of listings. Stay on top of internship priorities and deadlines by creating a spreadsheet, on Google or with Excel, to keep track of the opportunities you’re interested in. Some important things to record:

  • Name of internship opportunity
  • Company
  • Industry
  • Paid or unpaid
  • Location
  • Materials needed for the application
  • Deadlines
  • Name and contact information of the hiring manager
  • Name and contact information of any connections you have at that company

You can narrow down a final list to apply to based on certain priorities like paid or unpaid, location (affects transportation & housing costs, pay), etc.

Applying

Once you’ve gathered all your application materials and have had someone else to review your resume and cover letters, start submitting them! You can reach out to contacts in your network that may work for that company to let them know that you’re interested and ask if they’d be willing to refer your application.

March

En Process

If a company responds to your application, make sure you respond quickly. A good rule is to always respond within 24 hours. This is the time you will start getting interview offers.

Tips on preparing for the interview:

  • You can reach out to your network, alumni, etc. and see if anyone has insight into their interview process.
  • Do some research via Glassdoor and other similar websites.
  • Go through each responsibility listed on the internship posting and write a related skill, class, or experience that shows you are a good fit. Remember these for the interview.
  • Interviews require formal business clothing. Business attire is expensive. If you are not able to find affordable options, organizations like Dress for Success and the Hope Program offer free professional clothing for those who need it. Do not be afraid to use the programs that are out there to help you.
  • The interview is your chance to get clarification on any ambiguities you may have encountered – is the internship paid or unpaid, are you the only intern, how big is the intern class, are there any direct-hire opportunities after graduation?

April

Decision Time

You should have most of your offers in by now. All that’s left to do is to determine which offer most closely meets your interests, priorities, and budget. If you are relocating for the internship, now is the time to figure housing out.

May

Preparing for the big day!

Make sure that everything is in place for when your internship starts – housing, method of transportation, paperwork. Make sure you know where the office is, work hours, office dress code, and if there’s anything you need to bring on your first day.

Landing an internship is mostly staying organized, being prepared, and following up, so make sure you are staying on top of things! Good luck!

BSAP at the Rotary Club

Nancy Scull (BSAP) and Tonia Harries (BSAP Award Winner) visited the Rotary Club of Gaithersburg on January 8, 2018.

Nancy Scull and Tonia Harries introduced our group to The Bernie Scholarship Awards Program. It was founded in 1995 by Mr. Bernie Tetreault to aid high school seniors, and adults beginning or returning to school, with the cost of college or vocational training. Recipients must live in Montgomery County subsidized rental housing. It is a component fund of the Greater Washington Community Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization, so all donations to the program are tax-exempt.

Nancy said there were 63 awardees in 2018. She hopes to have a similar number in 2019 and to provide each with a $1,500 award. That might be increased to $2,000 in the year 2020 (coincidence?). A huge 98% of scholarship recipients finish their college degrees or training licenses, 67% pursue 4-year degrees, 17% an associates and 7% obtain masters degrees.

The Bernie Scholarship Awards Program strongly supports public service careers, 18-year-old and older students and “non-traditional” students. Nancy gave examples of people from difficult backgrounds who excelled with Bernie scholarships.

Tonia Harries is a beneficiary of the program. She spoke of how a scholarship had helped her move from near despair to a A.A.S. degree in Health Information Management, which she will complete in 2019.  It has made a huge difference in her life.

The organization’s website is www.berniescholarships.org. Through this site, one can donate (tax-exempt) to the program and, also, apply for a scholarship.

Donations Needed – BSAP Begins 2019 Campaign

The Bernie Scholarship Awards Program’s mission is to provide financial assistance for college or vocational training programs to graduating high school seniors and other adults who are low-income and live in subsidized rental housing in Montgomery County, Maryland. Our goal is to help our recipients achieve a better future, to rise above their challenging circumstances. The scholarship that we provide may literally be life-changing to a recipient and his/her family. Our awardees are so determined that 98% complete their degrees!

In September 2018, we kicked off another year for our program. We hope to assist more students and to provide higher award amounts in 2019. To do this, we need to raise more funds for scholarships that can be used for tuition, books, fees, computer equipment, transportation, and child care for deserving students. This is exciting and will have an incredibly positive impact on our potential awardees.

In 2018 we had the largest number of awardees ever in our 23-year history; we had 63 awardees, compared to a high of 39 awardees in prior years. In 2019 our goal is to assist even more students and to increase the award amount to $2,000.

If you are interested in more information on our nonprofit, please see www.berniescholarships.org or contact us at contact@berniescholarships.org. If you know someone who could benefit from our scholarship program, please share this information.

Thank you, Theresa Wells, Board Member

Did you know? BSAP Provides Ongoing Mentoring

The Merriam-Webster definition of mentor is “a trusted counselor or guide.” Mentorship is part of the mission of our foundation. One-on-one mentorship relationships between board members and scholarship recipients underscores our dedication to the success of our scholarship recipients.

The following is an interesting article that contrasts a coach to a mentor. While coaching is important and needed to assist at the task level, a mentor is committed to building a long-term relationship to assist in the development of the individual. Building a relationship based on trust and guidance is key. We will share stories of some of these relationships that have been built through our program in future posts.

Please share our page and posts with your friends, family and contacts who may benefit from our work of awarding scholarships to qualifying Montgomery County residents.

https://www.management-mentors.com/resources/coaching-mentoring-differences

26 Tips for Success in College

Recently, a post by Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld called, “How to Study Like a Harvard Student” has been making the rounds on the blogging site Tumblr. Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld is both a Harvard and Yale Law graduate and the daughter of infamous “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother” author, Amy Chua. Studying for exams can sometimes be daunting, but if you pay attention, plan ahead, and study effectively, it will make a big difference in how confident you feel and how well you will perform. Read a paraphrased version of Sophia’s helpful tips below. You can find the original here.

Preliminary Steps

1. Choose classes that genuinely interest you – that way studying won’t feel like such a drag.
2. Make friends. See steps 12, 23, 24.

General Principles

3. Study less, but study better.
4. Avoid Autopilot Brain at all costs.
5. Vague is bad. Vague is a waste of your time.
6. Write it down.
7. Sometimes it can be rough, but buckle down and get it done.

Plan of Attack Phase I: Class

8. Show up to class. Everything will make a lot more sense that way, and you will save yourself a lot of time in the long run.
9. Take notes by hand. It is better for learning and retention and is less distracting than taking notes on a computer.

Phase II: Study Time

10. Get out of the library. The sheer fact of being in a library doesn’t fill you with knowledge. 8 hours of Facebooking in the library is still eight hours of Facebooking. Study without sacrificing your quality of life by quizzing yourself while still doing everyday tasks like eating or showering.
11. Do a little every day, but don’t let it be your whole day. “This afternoon, I will read a chapter of something and do half a problem set. Then, I will watch an episode of my favorite TV show and go to the gym” ALWAYS BEATS “Starting right now, I am going to read as much as I possibly can…oh wow, now it’s midnight, I’m on page five, and have done nothing for 6 hours.”
12. Give yourself incentive. There’s nothing worse than a gaping abyss of study time. If you know you’re going out in 6 hours, you’re more likely to get something done.
13. Self-care is important, but it can also be really tempting to take breaks when you really don’t need them. When you think about taking a break, try pushing through until you really need one.

Phase III: Assignments

14. Stop highlighting. Highlighting is supposed to keep you focused, but it’s actually a one-way ticket to Autopilot Brain. Write notes in the margins instead.
15. Do all your own work. You get nothing out of copying a problem set. If you don’t know how to solve the problem, attempt it anyways and review the answer key afterwards to help you understand what you did wrong.
16. Read as much as you can. No way around it. Stop trying to cheat with Sparknotes.
17. Be a smart reader, not a robot. Ask yourself: What is the author trying to prove? What is the logical progression of the argument? You can usually answer these questions by reading the introduction and conclusion of every chapter. Then, pick any two examples/anecdotes and commit them to memory (write them down). They will help you reconstruct the author’s argument later on.
18. Don’t read everything, understand everything that you read. Better to have a deep understanding of a limited amount of material than to have a vague understanding of an entire course. Once again: Vague is bad. Vague is a waste of your time.
19. If you do not understand an assignment, go to office hours. Ask for help. It will also help you get to know your professors, which is important for any letters of recommendation you may need to seek in the future.

Phase IV: Reading Period (Review Week)

20. Once again: do not move into the library. Eat, sleep, and bathe.
21. If you don’t understand it, it will probably be on the exam. Review your textbooks, ask your classmates, go to office hours, or looking it up on the internet.
22. Do all the practice problems.
23. You will be required to memorize formulas, names and dates. To memorize effectively: Stop reading your list over and over again. Say it out loud, write it down. Have your friends quiz you, then return the favor.
24. Ask your friends to listen while you explain a difficult concept to them. This forces you to articulate your understanding. Remember, vague is bad.
25. Go for the big picture. Try to figure out where a specific concept fits into the course as a whole. This will help you tap into Big Themes – every class has Big Themes – which will streamline what you need to know. You can learn a million facts, but until you understand how they fit together, you’re missing the point.

Phase V: Exam Day

26. Crush exam. Get A.

Building a Better Community, One Scholarship at a Time